Three Hook Set-Ups | Salmon University

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Three Hook Set-Ups

By on June 19, 2015

Each week one of the Salmon University experts answers reader questions in our “Ask a Pro” feature. This week’s questions are answered by Tom Nelson. Submit your own question here.

Q: We will be in the gulf islands BC mid August. Where would we find the best results for kings or silvers? Any recommendations for good charter boats in this region? – John

A: Hi John – the best fishing in the Gulf Islands in August would be along the eastern banks of the Gulf Islands. I would highly recommend you get in touch with BonChovy Charters. They are located on Granville Island in Vancouver BC and offer fully guided trips in the Gulf Islands. You will get a first-class fishing experience in one of the most beautiful places in the Northwest.

Q: Is it legal to troll with a 3 hook set up? When we troll for silvers we have a lot of strikes but our catch ratio is less than 50%. Any suggestions will be appreciated. Thank you – Raymond

A: Hi Raymond – If you are having a lot of strikes, but losing Coho, rather than run 3 hooks, which is illegal in most areas on the west coast, try dropping your tail hook back further. I assume you are either fishing with a hootchie or bait. With a hootchie, use beads inside the lure to make your top hook just reach to the tail of the hootchie and the bottom hook should be completely outside. Salmon are notoriously short strikers and by dropping back your hook you will not only hook more fish but get a more solid hook-up. If you are using a herring, put your top hook back towards the tail and let the bottom hook drop back about 2 inches.

image courtesy Kevin Klein


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Tom Nelson
Tom Nelson is the publisher of Known throughout the Pacific Northwest as the “Dean of Saltwater Fishing,” he has helped develop and test tackle and gear for Scotty, Pro-Troll and Silver Horde, is a regular speaker at area sports shows, has taught more than 5,000 students how to fish during his classes at western Washington community colleges, and is the co-founder of the Puget Sound Anglers.