Tight Lines | Salmon University

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Tight Lines

By on September 18, 2015

Each week one of the Salmon University experts answers reader questions in our “Ask a Pro” feature. This week’s questions are answered by Tom Nelson. Submit your own question here.

Q: I switched to scotty braided line on my 1106s. The orange stops keep coming off and I lost one ball. Any tips on keeping them tight? I was wondering about glue? – Arne

Arne – I always attach three stops together on my braided line. So far I’ve had no problem with them coming off. However, other anglers have. Scotty has a new product (#374 Sure Stop Downrigger Stopper Kit) that works very well and solves these problems.

Q: I have always downrigger fished with a flasher, then a hoochie or lure. I was reading about putting the flasher on the downrigger weight and running the lure separate. I know that the flasher provides action for the lure, but is this method effective for catching salmon? It seems like we could run lighter gear and spend more time playing the fish instead of the flasher. I am just concerned that we might never hook up. What is the expert opinion on this? – Dave

You are correct. You will be able to run lighter line and get a better fight out of your fish by separating it from the flasher. The best way to do this is to tie your flasher directly off the downrigger ball with five-feet of heavy leader on it. Five feet above that, attach your release clip and ten-feet of leader to your lure. Use a lure with action of its own, like a spoon or a herring in a head. The sound of the flasher will attract the fish and they will move up a few feet and hit the lure which will result in a terrific fight.

Q: Just a shout-out to you all – the dry brine recipe that you have on your website is the only one I use when I smoke salmon, thanks for sharing. – Victor

Victor – we’re glad you like it.

cover image courtesy Cyndi Lanier

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Tom Nelson
Tom Nelson is the publisher of salmonuniversity.com. Known throughout the Pacific Northwest as the “Dean of Saltwater Fishing,” he has helped develop and test tackle and gear for Scotty, Pro-Troll and Silver Horde, is a regular speaker at area sports shows, has taught more than 5,000 students how to fish during his classes at western Washington community colleges, and is the co-founder of the Puget Sound Anglers.